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Factors associated with regular interprofessional interaction by doctors of optometry in management of patients with diabetes mellitus
ARTICLE

, , , Western University of Health Sciences, United States

Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice Volume 10, Number 1, ISSN 2405-4526 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Interprofessional interaction is important in the care of patients with diabetes. This study investigated factors associated with doctors' of optometry regular and ongoing interprofessional interaction for patients with diabetes and their satisfaction with interprofessional interaction.A cross-sectional electronic survey was conducted in 2016 with 9607 doctors of optometry. The survey included consent, demographics, and interprofessional interaction. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate factors associated with regular interprofessional interaction.The survey was completed by 668 doctors of optometry who examined patients with diabetes in the previous year. The average age of respondents was 47 years and 54.7% were male. Half (46.0%) practice in the private setting, and 15.7% manage ≥30 patients with diabetes per week. The majority of respondents (96.9%) interact with other healthcare professionals at least once a year and 59.4% interact regularly; 65.6% are satisfied with their interprofessional interaction. Controlling for other factors, doctors of optometry who practice in a rural area [Odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) = 2.81 (1.78–4.44)], spend ≥40% of practice time managing ocular diseases [2.56 (1.75–3.73)], manage ≥30 diabetes patients per week [1.88 (1.07–3.31)], have residency training [1.64 (1.11–2.42)], or have a greater number of years in practice [1.02 (1.01–1.04)] were associated with higher likelihood of regular interprofessional interaction. Doctors of optometry who regularly participate in interprofessional interaction were more likely to be satisfied with their interactions [3.54 (2.54–4.95)] and more likely to believe that team-based care makes a difference in patient outcomes [2.15 (1.01–4.57)] and in patient satisfaction [1.81 (1.00–3.26)]. The barriers to caring for patients with diabetes included patients' lack of diabetes knowledge (41.6% greatly impact/entirely impact) and lack of access to medical information (30.5% greatly impact/entirely impact).

Citation

Napier-Dovorany, K., An, J. & Hoppe, E. (2018). Factors associated with regular interprofessional interaction by doctors of optometry in management of patients with diabetes mellitus. Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice, 10(1), 6-11. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved February 6, 2023 from .

This record was imported from Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice on January 29, 2019. Journal of Interprofessional Education & Practice is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.xjep.2017.10.003

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