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In Defense of the Online "Lecture"
PROCEEDINGS

, Concordia University, Canada

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-56-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The lecture is the traditional means of transferring content in learning programs. The lecture takes a variety of forms in e-learning programs. In live virtual classes, the lecture often takes the form of an instructor narrating a presentation of PowerPoint slides. A lecture in a live virtual class might also take the form of a videotape of an expert. In asynchronous learning programs, the lecture often takes the form of a sequence of slides that learners are intended to read in their entirety. But lectures might also take the form of recorded sequences of narration, either by an anonymous narrator or a subject-matter expert, who might be narrating a script that also appears online. In addition, an online lecture might also take the form of a reading from an original source, such as an article from a scientific or management journal. Although much maligned in popular writing about education, the lecture continues to be popular among instructional designers and offer many benefits as an instructional technique (Arthur, Bennett, Edens, and Bell, 2002).

Citation

Carliner, S. (2005). In Defense of the Online "Lecture". In P. Kommers & G. Richards (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2005--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (p. 2769). Montreal, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 17, 2019 from .