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How the views of faculty can inform undergraduate Web-based research: Implications for academic writing
ARTICLE

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Computers and Composition Volume 23, Number 4 ISSN 8755-4615 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

The steady increase in the use of Web sites as sources in undergraduate research-based papers has raised concerns about the suitability of these reference materials for citation and about the ability of undergraduates to distinguish between appropriate and inappropriate sources in academic writing. While informal means of evaluating Web sites are in existence, there is a need for Web-source assessment criteria that not only focus on the use of these particular sources in introductory undergraduate writing programs but also closely match the requirements of faculty within a specific academic field. This paper identifies elements of a prototypical rating instrument for students in Humanities courses based on the results of a three-part survey of faculty members in a Humanities Department (N=31) and highlights the divergence between criteria that faculty found crucial and those that many undergraduate students appear to be using in their Web-based research.

Citation

Helms-Park, R. & Stapleton, P. How the views of faculty can inform undergraduate Web-based research: Implications for academic writing. Computers and Composition, 23(4), 444-461. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved May 14, 2021 from .

This record was imported from Computers and Composition on January 31, 2019. Computers and Composition is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compcom.2006.08.003

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