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How Computer Simulations Can Assist Model Generation In Students: Providing an Adaptable Structure to Guide Student Learning
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, , , , University of British Columbia, Canada

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-56-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Le Châtelier's principle and chemical equilibrium are considered two of the most difficult topics for students in high school chemistry, and despite the development of numerous simulations, software solutions have met with limited success. We present two case studies of expert teachers teaching Le Châtelier's Principle and show how the findings of the case studies have informed the design of a novel simulation. We have identified several key tactics used by these teachers that are not currently supported or enhanced by available simulations. Based on these studies, we have designed a novel simulation that 1) affords opportunities for model construction with analogies, 2) facilitates model evaluation by providing multiple reaction representations, and 3) guides learning by explicitly requesting predictions from students. This paper reveals strategies to promote model-based learning in chemistry and a design for an educational simulation that has been closely informed by model-based teaching practices.

Citation

Sprague, D., Trey, S., Pillay, S. & Khan, S. (2005). How Computer Simulations Can Assist Model Generation In Students: Providing an Adaptable Structure to Guide Student Learning. In P. Kommers & G. Richards (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2005--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1666-1673). Montreal, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 30, 2020 from .

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