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Representing Rolling Sequences of Polyhedra to Support Mathematics Comprehension PROCEEDINGS

, University of Western Ontario, Canada

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-56-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

CopyCat is a geometric game where the goal is to use the patterned faces of a polyhedron to create a Mosaic. The polyhedron's orientation is manipulated by rolling. Sequences of rolls can exhibit properties like non-commutativity, non-associativity, and non-closure. This paper presents visual explanations of these properties in the context of rolling polyhedra. Maps depicting the sequences of rolls use the geometric properties of the map to exhibit the regularities in the sequences. Currently, the maps can be used as tools external to the game but the ultimate goal of these visual explanations is to use them to guide the design of new CopyCat tools and interfaces that promote understanding of mathematical subtleties of rolling sequences.

Citation

Morey, J. (2005). Representing Rolling Sequences of Polyhedra to Support Mathematics Comprehension. In P. Kommers & G. Richards (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2005--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1279-1283). Montreal, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 22, 2018 from .

Keywords

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Cited By

  1. A survey of navigation interaction in computer-based learning environments

    Hai-Ning Liang & Sedig Kamran, University of Western Ontario, Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2006 (June 2006) pp. 684–691

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.