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Gendered emotion management and teacher outcomes in secondary school teaching: A review
ARTICLE

, School of Social Science, Australia ; , School of Humanities and Social Inquiry, Australia ; , Learning Sciences Institute Australia, Australia ; , School of Humanities and Social Inquiry, Australia ; , School of Teacher Education and Leadership, Australia ; , Learning Sciences Institute Australia, Australia

TATE Volume 80, Number 1, ISSN 0742-051X Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This systematic search and review of international literature (1979–2017) finds links between emotion management and gender (in 1/2 the studies), and teaching attrition outcomes (1/3). Results contextualise these connections, suggesting female teachers use deep acting strategies, though experience more emotional exhaustion and unpleasant emotions. Male teachers practice distancing and surface acting, and experience depersonalisation, but also success in controlling disruptions and stimulating subject interest. Studies are limited by self-reported data and omission of school context, but highlight important teacher organisational identifications, suggesting future research use observational methods for understanding emotion management as an embedded, interactionist phenomenon.

Citation

Olson, R.E., McKenzie, J., Mills, K.A., Patulny, R., Bellocchi, A. & Caristo, F. (2019). Gendered emotion management and teacher outcomes in secondary school teaching: A review. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 80(1), 128-144. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved March 5, 2021 from .

This record was imported from Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies on March 15, 2019. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2019.01.010

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