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When can animation improve learning? Some implications on human computer interaction and learning
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, Columbia University, United States ; , Teachers College Columbia University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-56-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

For decades, research comparing the effectiveness of text and static illustrations with animation and narration to enhance learning has been inconclusive (Tversky et al., 2002). We argue that the failure to ascertain the benefits of animation in learning may also relate to how it is constructed, perceived, and conceptualized. Based on cognitive science and human learning theories, this paper proposes a format- support hypothesis of learning. To validate this hypothesis, we implemented a special form of animation, direct-manipulation animation. An empirical study was conducted and results corroborated our hypothesis; direct-manipulation animation group significantly outperformed system-controlled animation group on written recall and system drawing. From these findings, we recommend some design prinicples of computer-based animation to enhance HCI and foster effective learning.

Citation

Chan, M. & Black, J. (2005). When can animation improve learning? Some implications on human computer interaction and learning. In P. Kommers & G. Richards (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2005--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 933-938). Montreal, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 15, 2019 from .

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