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The effects of computer self-efficacy, training satisfaction and test anxiety on attitude and performance in computerized adaptive testing
ARTICLE

, , , College of Communication, China ; , Faculty of Science and Technology, Canada

Computers & Education Volume 100, Number 1, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This study focused on test-takers’ psychological effects on computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The development and implementation of CAT were based on item response theory (IRT), and two-parameter logistic model was chosen for the items. The total of 268 students from a high school in Jinan took part in the English adaptive test. A structural equation model was used to examine the potential connections among a series of individual variables (computer self-efficacy, training satisfaction, test anxiety, CAT attitude and CAT performance). The findings revealed significant positive paths from computer self-efficacy and training satisfaction to CAT attitude, as well as a negative path from test anxiety to CAT performance. Furthermore, there was significant correlation between the residual variances of CAT attitude and CAT performance. Thus, it could be seen CAT might produce an unfair disadvantage for test-takers with higher test anxiety. The relevant research and implications were further discussed.

Citation

Lu, H., Hu, Y.p., Gao, J.j. & Kinshuk. (2016). The effects of computer self-efficacy, training satisfaction and test anxiety on attitude and performance in computerized adaptive testing. Computers & Education, 100(1), 45-55. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved January 27, 2023 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 29, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2016.04.012

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