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The effect of presentation mode on children's reading preferences, performance, and self-evaluations
ARTICLE

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Computers & Education Volume 126, Number 1, ISSN 0360-1315 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

There has been a significant rise in the use of computers and electronic devices for reading in both personal and educational settings. Work on the effects of presentation modality on reading performance and self-evaluation has explored these issues with adults (e.g., Ackerman & Goldsmith, 2011; Ackerman & Lauterman, 2012; Singer & Alexander, 2016) and with adolescents (e.g., Mangen, Walgermo, & Brønnick, 2013; Rasmusson, 2014). Less is known about how children's reading preferences, performance, and self-evaluations are affected by screen vs. print tasks.In this study, 82 fifth and sixth grade students read texts on a computer screen and on paper. They answered comprehension questions and rated their confidence in their answers. In addition, they completed preference questionnaires prior to and after the task. Results indicated that children prefer reading from a screen. They performed significantly better on paper and were more confident and calibrated than when reading from a screen. Finally, post-task preference questionnaires indicated that children's preference for screen reading decreased from pre to post test. Theoretical and pedagogical implications are discussed.

Citation

Dahan Golan, D., Barzillai, M. & Katzir, T. (2018). The effect of presentation mode on children's reading preferences, performance, and self-evaluations. Computers & Education, 126(1), 346-358. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved August 18, 2022 from .

This record was imported from Computers & Education on January 29, 2019. Computers & Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2018.08.001

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