You are here:

The effects of reading to prepare for argumentative discussion on cognitive engagement and conceptual growth
ARTICLE

, , , , Center for the Study of Reading, United States ; , Illinois State University, United States ; , Center for the Study of Reading, United States

Learning and Instruction Volume 33, Number 1, ISSN 0959-4752 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Dialogue based approaches to education have been shown to benefit students through the quality of shared discourse. Warm conceptual change theories propose that these benefits are also mediated by increasing student engagement. Discourse and engagement effects were isolated in this study by having 130 third and fourth grade students read a science text for different purposes (no stated purpose, to prepare for a regular classroom discussion, or to prepare for an argumentative discussion) and then testing children before the discussion took place. Children who anticipated a discussion, especially an argumentative discussion, read more slowly than other children after controlling for fluency. A subset of reading times predicted conceptual growth. Finally some children who participated in argumentative discussions had higher rates of conceptual growth. Results substantiate the efficacy of argumentative discussion as a context for reading scientific texts, and they support the central mechanism of dual-processing theories of warm conceptual change.

Citation

Miller, B.W., Anderson, R.C., Morris, J., Lin, T.J., Jadallah, M. & Sun, J. (2014). The effects of reading to prepare for argumentative discussion on cognitive engagement and conceptual growth. Learning and Instruction, 33(1), 67-80. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved December 14, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Learning and Instruction on January 29, 2019. Learning and Instruction is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2014.04.003

Keywords