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Directly controlling teacher behaviors as predictors of poor motivation and engagement in girls and boys: The role of anger and anxiety
ARTICLE

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Learning and Instruction Volume 15, Number 5, ISSN 0959-4752 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

We focused on potential effects of directly controlling teacher behaviors (DCTB), such as giving frequent directives, interfering with children's preferred pace of learning, and not allowing critical and independent opinions. We hypothesized that children's perceptions of their teachers as directly controlling would arouse anger and anxiety in children, and these emotions would enhance a-motivation and extrinsic motivation, which, respectively, would undermine intensive academic engagement and promote restricted engagement. Three hundred and nineteen Israeli 4th–5th graders completed questionnaires assessing the variables of interest. The extent to which children showed intensive academic engagement was assessed by their primary teachers. Path analyses supported the expected relations. DCTB appear particularly harmful because they lead to a-motivation that is intertwined with anger and anxiety.

Citation

Assor, A., Kaplan, H., Kanat-Maymon, Y. & Roth, G. (2005). Directly controlling teacher behaviors as predictors of poor motivation and engagement in girls and boys: The role of anger and anxiety. Learning and Instruction, 15(5), 397-413. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved July 6, 2022 from .

This record was imported from Learning and Instruction on January 29, 2019. Learning and Instruction is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.learninstruc.2005.07.008

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