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The role of self-regulated learning in students' success in flipped undergraduate math courses
ARTICLE

, Department of Business and Economics, Denmark ; , , Department of Education Studies, United States

Internet and Higher Education Volume 36, Number 1, ISSN 1096-7516 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

Based upon the self-regulated learning theory, this study examined the relationships between academic achievement and three key self-regulatory constructs - prior domain knowledge, self-efficacy, and the use of learning strategies - in two flipped undergraduate math courses. Structural equation modeling was employed as the primary method to analyze the relationships in both the pre-class and in-class learning environments of the flipped courses. The results of the study showed that students' self-efficacy in learning math and the use of help seeking strategies were all significantly positively related with academic achievement in both pre- and in-class learning environments. In addition, students' self-efficacy in collaborative learning had a positive impact on their use of help seeking strategies during in-class learning. The theoretical and instructional implications are discussed.

Citation

Sun, Z., Xie, K. & Anderman, L.H. (2018). The role of self-regulated learning in students' success in flipped undergraduate math courses. Internet and Higher Education, 36(1), 41-53. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved July 20, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Internet and Higher Education on January 29, 2019. Internet and Higher Education is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2017.09.003

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