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Looking at the past to change the future: a retrospective study of associate degree in nursing graduates' National Council Licensure Examination scores
ARTICLE

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Teaching and Learning in Nursing Volume 6, Number 3 ISSN 1557-3087 Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This is a retrospective study comparing academic records and demographic data of students in an associate degree in nursing program who failed the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) with students who passed the NCLEX-RN. The sample was obtained from the population of graduates from courses spanning one academic calendar year. The study examined the relationship between multiple variables and success on the NCLEX-RN. The dependent variable was passing NCLEX-RN. Several independent variables include entering cumulative grade point average (GPA), entering nursing curriculum GPA, preadmission examination score, terminal grades in each of the five clinical nursing courses, National League for Nursing examination scores taken in various program courses, graduating GPA, and Health Education Systems, Inc. (HESI), examination score taken at the end of the program. Standardized test results and the pass/fail rate in the nursing courses taught in the curriculum appear to be the most significant variables identified in profiling the student most likely to fail NCLEX-RN. Males and minorities (Black, Hispanic, and Asian) had a lower pass rate than their White counterparts.

Citation

De Lima, M., London, L. & Manieri, E. Looking at the past to change the future: a retrospective study of associate degree in nursing graduates' National Council Licensure Examination scores. Teaching and Learning in Nursing, 6(3), 119-123. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved August 26, 2019 from .

This record was imported from Teaching and Learning in Nursing on January 29, 2019. Teaching and Learning in Nursing is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.teln.2011.01.001

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