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Coming to terms with “diversity” and “multiculturalism” in teacher education: Learning about our students, changing our practice
ARTICLE

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TATE Volume 15, Number 4, ISSN 0742-051X Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

A teacher educator team addressed negative student responses to a multicultural foundations course by designing an action research study to learn more about their student’s identities, experiences and beliefs. Through qualitative analysis of written assignments, they identified three categories of student beliefs about the purposes of schools in relation to cultural diversity in American society. These categories were reinforced through triangulation with data from focus group dialogues. The findings suggest relationships between previous cross-cultural experiences, gender, and beliefs. Focus group data also revealed unrecognized sources of student resistance to multicultural teacher education, even among students who took a transformative position.

Citation

Cockrell, K.S., Placier, P.L., Cockrell, D.H. & Middleton, J.N. (1999). Coming to terms with “diversity” and “multiculturalism” in teacher education: Learning about our students, changing our practice. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 15(4), 351-366. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved March 30, 2020 from .

This record was imported from Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies on January 29, 2019. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0742-051X(98)00050-X

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