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The impact of student characteristics and teacher efficacy on teachers’ predictions of student success
ARTICLE

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TATE Volume 21, Number 3 ISSN 0742-051X Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

This study examined how the interaction between student and teacher characteristics affects teachers’ predictions of students’ academic and social success. Three hundred and eighty-four general education teachers responded to (a) one of 32 possible case studies describing a student, in which gender, reading achievement, social behavior, and attentiveness were manipulated experimentally and (b) to a 16-item teacher-efficacy scale. Results showed that (1) teachers with high efficacy make less negative predictions about students, and seem to adjust their predictions when student characteristics change, while low efficacy teachers seem to be paying attention to a single characteristic when making their predictions. (2) All teachers respond similarly to students who exhibit a combination of aggressive and inattentive behaviors, that is, if students are friendly, inattentiveness is tolerated more than if they are aggressive. (3) All teachers make higher predictions of academic success for students reading on grade level even when they are aggressive, than for students reading below grade level even when they are friendly. The authors discuss the importance of attending to the complexity of characteristics each student brings in to the classroom.

Citation

Tournaki, N. & Podell, D.M. The impact of student characteristics and teacher efficacy on teachers’ predictions of student success. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 21(3), 299-314. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved September 22, 2020 from .

This record was imported from Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies on January 29, 2019. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2005.01.003

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