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Borders to cross: Identifying sources of tension in mentor–intern relationships
ARTICLE

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TATE Volume 24, Number 8, ISSN 0742-051X Publisher: Elsevier Ltd

Abstract

We used border crossing as a theoretical framework to explore the tensions that developed between two mentor–intern pairs during the course of a yearlong internship in high schools in the United States. Interviews with mentors and interns, and observations of planning sessions, teaching episodes, and follow-up conferences indicated that differing conceptions of mentoring, expectations related to communication, and beliefs about teaching formed the primary borders that the pairs had to navigate. Findings from the study suggest that the university must take a greater role in fostering communication between mentors and interns, and in providing on-going support to mentors engaged in teacher education.

Citation

Bradbury, L.U. & Koballa, T.R. (2008). Borders to cross: Identifying sources of tension in mentor–intern relationships. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 24(8), 2132-2145. Elsevier Ltd. Retrieved December 5, 2022 from .

This record was imported from Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies on January 28, 2019. Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies is a publication of Elsevier.

Full text is availabe on Science Direct: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2008.03.002

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