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The Effectiveness of Computerized Instructional Packages on Concept Acquisition and Improving Academic Achievement among Female Deaf Students in KSA
ARTICLE

Journal of Education and Practice Volume 7, Number 21, ISSN 2222-1735

Abstract

The current study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of computerized instructional packages on concept acquisition and improving academic achievement among deaf students in Saudi Arabia. The sample consisted of (16) third-grade female deaf students in prep stage for the first semester of the academic year 2013/2014, randomly selected from schools in the city of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia and distributed evenly to two groups: control group (n = 8) and experimental group (n = 8). Quasi-experimental method was used to achieve the objective of the study. Computerized instructional packages, test of concept acquisition and academic achievement test were utilized to collect data. The results showed statistically significant differences between the performances' mean of the control group and experimental group in the concept acquisition posttest and academic achievement posttest, and differences were in favor of the experimental group. The study recommended the need to provide computerized instructional packages in all institutes and programs for people with special needs, especially the deaf, and with concern for the provision of modern methods that take into account the easiness and performance effectiveness. The study also recommended the need to train teachers of students with special needs, specifically the deaf, on the use of computerized instructional packages, in addition to the need for an education technology specialist for the deaf in each institute.

Citation

Bagabas, H.A. (2016). The Effectiveness of Computerized Instructional Packages on Concept Acquisition and Improving Academic Achievement among Female Deaf Students in KSA. Journal of Education and Practice, 7(21), 65-71. Retrieved October 19, 2019 from .

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