You are here:

The Effect on Pupils' Science Performance and Problem-Solving Ability through Lego: An Engineering Design-Based Modeling Approach
ARTICLE

, , ,

Journal of Educational Technology & Society Volume 19, Number 3, ISSN 1176-3647 e-ISSN 1176-3647

Abstract

Incorporating scientific fundamentals via engineering through a design-based methodology has proven to be highly effective for STEM education. Engineering design can be instantiated for learning as they involve mental and physical stimulation and develop practical skills especially in solving problems. Lego bricks, as a set of toys based on design technique, are in line with the cognitive characteristics of students and provide a good game-based learning tool for engineering education. Many studies have incorporated Lego to investigate students' scientific attitudes, science inquiry skills, and problem-solving strategies, yet few address the effects of engineering design-based learning on pupils' problem-solving abilities. Therefore, this paper conducted an experiment and included control group to examine how fourth-grade students' science performance and problem-solving abilities change over the engineering design-based science learning by using Lego bricks. Results indicate that: (1) pupils' science performance significantly improved on both the control and the experimental groups, (2) pupils' gains of problem-solving ability in the experimental group were significantly improved, and (3) the males made a significant progress in problem-solving ability than the females in the experimental group. The key findings, possible reasons behind them, and potential benefits in the context of learning are also discussed.

Citation

Li, Y., Huang, Z., Jiang, M. & Chang, T.W. (2016). The Effect on Pupils' Science Performance and Problem-Solving Ability through Lego: An Engineering Design-Based Modeling Approach. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 19(3), 143-156. Retrieved August 22, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on January 10, 2019. [Original Record]

ERIC is sponsored by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) of the U.S. Department of Education.

Copyright for this record is held by the content creator. For more details see ERIC's copyright policy.

Keywords