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Primary Assessment Activity and Learner Perceptions of Attitude Change in Four MOOCs
ARTICLE

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Educational Media International Volume 54, Number 3, ISSN 0952-3987

Abstract

This study seeks to examine perceptions of attitudinal change in relation to the primary assessment activity within four Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) that were designed for attitudinal learning. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, we sought to understand if by focusing on assessing cognitive learning (quizzes) as opposed to behavioral learning (personal projects), the courses would result in greater reported attitude change in the respective areas. The second component of the study examined whether learners who identified cognitive learning (quizzes) as opposed to behavioral learning (personal projects) as the most impactful learning activity (or vice versa) reported stronger learning in the respective attitudinal component. Using an author-created survey that included learner reported attitudinal learning, perceptions of attitude change were collected. Results revealed that learners who utilized assessment activities focusing on behavioral learning did not report higher perceptions of behavioral learning. In contrast, learners utilizing assessment activities that focused on cognitive learning did report higher perceptions of cognitive learning. We conclude with a discussion of instructional design and facilitation of learning in MOOCs, as well as instruction for attitudinal learning within open-learning environments.

Citation

Watson, S.L., Watson, W.R. & Kim, W. (2017). Primary Assessment Activity and Learner Perceptions of Attitude Change in Four MOOCs. Educational Media International, 54(3), 245-260. Retrieved November 19, 2019 from .

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