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The Effect of Using Video Technology on Improving Reading Comprehension of Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners
ARTICLE

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Advances in Language and Literary Studies Volume 9, Number 2,

Abstract

With the development of educational technology, the concept of technology-enhanced multimedia instructions is using widely in the educational settings. Technology can be employed in teaching different skills such as listening, reading, speaking and writing. Among these skills, reading comprehension is the skill in which EFL learners have some problems to master. Regarding this issue, the present study aimed at investigating the effect of video materials on improving reading comprehension of Iranian intermediate EFL learners. A Longman Placement Test was administered to 30 EFL learners to ensure that learners are at the same level of proficiency. The students were chosen from the state high schools in Chabahar. The participants were regarded as intermediate learners and were divided into two groups (one experimental group and one control group). Then, a pre-test of reading comprehension was administered to assess the participants' reading comprehension. The participants of experimental group used video files to improve their reading comprehension while the control group received conventional approaches of teaching reading comprehension. Finally, all the participants were assigned a 40-item multiple-choice reading comprehension post-test. The results of the study indicated that video materials had a significant effect on promoting reading comprehension of Iranian intermediate EFL learners (p = 0.000, <0.05).

Citation

Mohammadian, A., Saed, A. & Shahi, Y. (2018). The Effect of Using Video Technology on Improving Reading Comprehension of Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners. Advances in Language and Literary Studies, 9(2), 17-23. Retrieved January 30, 2023 from .

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