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Sound Literature: The Pedagogy of Reconnection through Student-Authored Audiobooks in the Spanish Curriculum
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Abstract

This article is based on a case study I presented at the elearning Symposium 2014 and focuses on an undergraduate project which had received the Teaching Enhancement and Student Success Fund at the University of Manchester two years before. The project was conceived as an outreach activity complementing the final year core language classes and aimed at engaging students with both reading and listening to advanced texts and enjoying literature through weekly reading groups and audiobooks. Ultimately, through reading and creating literature, the objective was to foster students' intercultural competence after the year abroad. It was thus a student-centred and task-orientated project involving the creation of an audiobook by its participants. To this end, different forms of technology were introduced, each serving a particular purpose and fitting into specific learning goals. In this article I will report on the use of tablet PC technology for marking and giving feedback as well as on the benefits of audiobooks for language teaching in the context of higher education, where they have not yet had an extensive use. [For the complete book, "10 Years of the LLAS eLearning Symposium: Case Studies in Good Practice," see ED577046.]

Citation

Lorenzo-Zamorano, S. Sound Literature: The Pedagogy of Reconnection through Student-Authored Audiobooks in the Spanish Curriculum. Retrieved January 25, 2022 from .

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