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The Impacts of Asynchronous Video Reflection on Social Presence: A Case Study
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, University of Minnesota, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-35-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

One of the problems students can have while learning online is the feeling of isolation and the lack social presence with others. This interpretive case study utilized qualitative methods for data collection and inductive data analysis to examine how an asynchronous video reflection tool impacted learners’ perception of social presence and their feeling of community in an online learning environment. The study found that getting familiar by seeing and hearing classmates in an online course may be important for the feeling of community, and this was most successful when students felt their classmates’ videos were authentic. Distractions in the recording and listening environment also played a factor in students’ reception of the videos. The practical implications of the study’s findings for practitioners working with asynchronous videos in online learning environments are discussed.

Citation

Koivula, M. (2018). The Impacts of Asynchronous Video Reflection on Social Presence: A Case Study. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1119-1128). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 25, 2019 from .

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