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Literacy Collaborative Cloud: Living the Dream
PROCEEDING

, Concordia University Chicago

World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning, in Concordia University Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA ISBN 978-1-939797-36-0

Abstract

The derivation of this study was a group of graduate students nearing the completion of their program in literacy who still had questions concerning the profession due to rapid changes affecting the field. The genesis of this study was a response to this insight. It was deduced creating a literacy collaborative cloud may help solve the problem by enabling literacy professionals a platform to continue working together ultimately to the benefit of their students, the profession, and themselves. A mixed method sequential explanatory study was conducted consisting of a survey (n=45) which then informed the semi-structured interviews (n=3). The data was triangulated (Denzin, 1970) to enhance the credibility of the study. The findings concluded recent graduate students and alumni felt they would benefit from the creation of the Literacy Collaborative Cloud bridging the gap between graduate school and the workplace. Due to their busy schedules many students were ecstatic; one stating if they had access to a social media collaborative platform on their mobile device they would be “living the dream” (Student Y2). Driven by mobile social media, the implications for the development of collaborative clouds bridging the gap between graduate schools and workplaces could significantly change the dynamics of the future. Recently, when international leaders in higher education were asked “what priorities will be emphasized in higher education over the next five years…seventy-seven percent responded bridging the gap between education and employment” (Marmolejo, 2018, p. 22). Connecting the university/employment gap represents the number one priority in higher education (Marmolejo).

Citation

Aker, M. (2018). Literacy Collaborative Cloud: Living the Dream. In D. Parsons, R. Power, A. Palalas, H. Hambrock & K. MacCallum (Eds.), Proceedings of 17th World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning (pp. 64-76). Concordia University Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Retrieved March 8, 2021 from .

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