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Use and Perceptions of Second Life by Distance Learners: Comparison with Other Communication Media
ARTICLE

, University of Glasgow ; , , University of Edinburgh

JDE Volume 30, Number 2, ISSN 0830-0445 Publisher: Athabasca University Press

Abstract

Research has demonstrated that the use of communication media in distance education can reduce the feeling of distance and isolation from peers and tutor, and provide opportunities for collaborative learning activities (Bates, 2005). The use of virtual worlds (VW) in education has increased in recent years, with Second Life (SL) being the most commonly used VW in higher education(Wang & Burton, 2012). There is a paucity of information available on students\u2019 use and perceptions of SL in relation to other online communication media available to the distance learner. Consequently, in the study described here, this area was explored with a group of students registered in a part-time distance education Master\u2019s program at a large UK University open to international students. A self-completion survey was designed to assess students\u2019 use and perceptions of using SL compared with other communication media. The majority of students rated SL lower than other forms of communications media such as email, WebCT discussion boards, Skype, and Wimba for facilitating communication, promoting the formation of social networks, fostering a sense of community, and benefiting their learning. It is possible that the results of this study were influenced by the lower frequency of use of SL in this program compared to other work reported on this subject. Further work is required to evaluate the effect of frequency of use of SL and availability of alternative communication media on students\u2019 use and perceptions of this virtual world.

Citation

Murray, J.A., Hale, F. & Dozier, M. (2016). Use and Perceptions of Second Life by Distance Learners: Comparison with Other Communication Media. The Journal of Distance Education / Revue de l'ducation Distance, 30(2),. Athabasca University Press. Retrieved October 18, 2019 from .