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Developing a Just-in-Time Adaptive Mobile Platform for Family Medicine Education: Experiential Lessons Learned PROCEEDING

, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), United States ; , , Indiana University School of Medicine, United States ; , Bowling Green State University, United States ; , Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, United States ; , Ball State University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-31-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

EASEL is a platform designed to provide just-in-time adaptive support to students during experiential learning interviews conducted as part of required work in an online course in a family medicine education program in a Midwestern urban university setting EASEL considers the time and location of the student and provides questions and content before, during, and after the interviews take place EASEL will provide a new way to facilitate and support online family medicine students as they meet with patients and healthcare professionals This paper presents a look at the considerations, issues, and lessons learned during the development process of this interdisciplinary collaborative effort between the platform designers and family medicine faculty while working toward completion of the study

Citation

Rogers, C., Cooper, S., Renshaw, S., Schnepp, J., Renguette, C. & Seig, M.T. (2017). Developing a Just-in-Time Adaptive Mobile Platform for Family Medicine Education: Experiential Lessons Learned. In J. Dron & S. Mishra (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 948-954). Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 23, 2018 from .

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