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The impact of scaffolding on characteristics of mental models during information-seeking activity
PROCEEDING

, , University of Rennes 2, France

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-31-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

With the development of e-learning and MOOCs, knowing how to improve information-seeking activity in video-based environments seems to be a major challenge in the coming years Previous research has shown benefits of scaffolding information-seeking in videos We hypothesize then that scaffolding helps information-seeking by providing an external, usable conceptual model Without scaffolding, users have to construct their own mental model, which is costly and time-consuming but serves therefore as an internal representation In the current study, students completed a search task and were divided into two conditions, with or without scaffolding Then they completed a localization task Results show that scaffolding has positive effects on search outcomes, but also that individuals who benefited first from scaffolding are less effective on the localization task than participants without scaffolding The hypothesis of a usable but external model provided by scaffolding is then supported

Citation

Cojean, S. & Jamet, E. (2017). The impact of scaffolding on characteristics of mental models during information-seeking activity. In J. Dron & S. Mishra (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 292-296). Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 23, 2019 from .

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