You are here:

Educational games as stand-alone learning tools and their motivational effect on L2 vocabulary acquisition and perceived learning gains
ARTICLE

British Journal of Educational Technology Volume 48, Number 2, ISSN 0007-1013 e-ISSN 0007-1013 Publisher: Wiley

Abstract

According to different authors, computer games not only teach contents and skills, but also do so in a more efficient manner, allowing long-lasting learning. However, there is still little consensus on this matter as different studies put their educational benefits into question, especially when used without instructional support. An empirical study was conducted to measure the effect of the educational game he onference nterpreter on L2 vocabulary acquisition and perceived learning gains, as compared with a non-gaming tool which replicated its contents. The results of pre-, post- and delayed tests showed that students that had access to the contents via the video game performed statistically better in the short run, found the materials more appealing and believed their vocabulary skills had developed further than those in the control group. However, the regression model showed that the actual enjoyment of the game seemed to have no effect on the students' learning outcomes, neither according to their own estimation nor as determined by testing. Of greater importance seemed to be extrinsic motivation, ie, their desire to play based upon expected learning gains, prior knowledge of tested L2 vocabulary and perceived difficulty of the educational contents.

Citation

Calvo‐Ferrer, J.R. (2017). Educational games as stand-alone learning tools and their motivational effect on L2 vocabulary acquisition and perceived learning gains. British Journal of Educational Technology, 48(2), 264-278. Wiley. Retrieved May 15, 2021 from .