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Community of Inquiry and Perceived Learning: The Impact of Blended Learning among High School Students
PROCEEDING

, Liberty University, United States ; , University of the District of Columbia, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Washington, DC ISBN 978-1-939797-29-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This causal comparative, quantitative study examined how blended learning impacts high school learners’ community of inquiry (CoI) and perceived learning in comparison to online instruction. The study answered the following research questions: (a) Do differences exist among the social presence, cognitive presence, and teaching presence of high school students enrolled in a blended course as compared to those enrolled in an online course? (b) Does a difference exist between perceived learning of high school students enrolled in a blended course as compared to that of those enrolled in an online course? The researchers conducted a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) to address the research questions. Data used for analysis was acquired from archival program effectiveness data collected from a southeastern public charter high school using the CoI survey and the Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor (CAP) Perceived Learning Scale.

Citation

Harrell, K. & Wendt, J. (2017). Community of Inquiry and Perceived Learning: The Impact of Blended Learning among High School Students. In J. Johnston (Ed.), Proceedings of EdMedia 2017 (pp. 501-508). Washington, DC: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 20, 2019 from .

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