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The Challenge of Designing Blended Courses: From Structured Design to Creative Faculty Support! | Les beaux dfis du design de cours hybrides : du design structur l’accompagnement cratif !
ARTICLE

CJLT Volume 41, Number 4, ISSN 1499-6677 e-ISSN 1499-6677 Publisher: Canadian Network for Innovation in Education

Abstract

This case study deals with the implementation of an e-learning program in a business school in Canada. Cabot Business School decided to offer the program in a blended format so as to increase the flexibility of the program for clientele enrolled in the undergraduate certificate program. A pilot was initiated in 2009 starting with four hybrid courses. Now, three years later, 35 courses are being offered in blended mode by lecturers and a handful of professors who, for the most part, had no previous experience teaching online. Given the rapid development of this program, this case deals with how the instructional designer, without the benefit of any additional resources, managed to juggle both the development of the certificate program as well as parallel projects. The issues encountered deal with the extent to which the instructional designer can support faculty who are converting their courses from in-class to online, one of the main design challenges encountered by faculty. This case describes training strategies and implemented solutions provided by the instructional designer as well as the results obtained, faculty perceptions, and food for thought on the possible evolution of the role of the instructional designer.

Citation

Carr, C. (2015). The Challenge of Designing Blended Courses: From Structured Design to Creative Faculty Support! | Les beaux dfis du design de cours hybrides : du design structur l’accompagnement cratif !. Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie, 41(4),. Canadian Network for Innovation in Education. Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

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References

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