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Transforming Education with Self-Directed Project-Based Learning: The Minnesota New Country School
ARTICLE

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Educational Technology Volume 54, Number 3, ISSN 0013-1962

Abstract

To achieve truly learner-centered instruction and assessment, Reigeluth (1994) and Reigeluth and Karnopp (2013) pointed out the importance of schools providing a caring environment. They indicated that such an environment could be ensured with better interaction and relationships among students and teachers in a small learning community. How can a school become a caring environment? What roles do students, teachers, and parents play in such an environment? How can instruction and assessment be based on individual learners' preferences? More importantly, are there schools like this anywhere in the world? This article describes and highlights one such school, the Minnesota New Country School (MNCS). Four design principles of the school--making this school unique--are explained: (1) small learning community, (2) self-directed project-based learning approach, (3) authentic assessment, and (4) teacher ownership and democratic governance. Some success stories of the school are presented.

Citation

Aslan, S., Reigeluth, C.M. & Thomas, D. (2014). Transforming Education with Self-Directed Project-Based Learning: The Minnesota New Country School. Educational Technology, 54(3), 39-42. Retrieved August 10, 2020 from .

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