You are here:

Faculty Development Initiative for Converting F2F Courses into Online Courses PROCEEDING

, , Sacred Heart University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Washington, DC, United States Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

With faculty development changes in practice from traditional face-to-face to online delivery modalities, this paper describes an initiative for faculty at a College of Education whereby pre-existing courses are converted for online delivery. Opportunities and challenges are examined and used in the development of best practices for faculty development that embrace the use of online modalities. What strategies can Online Learning Mentors use to achieve the expected outcomes when mentees differ in technology competencies, pedagogical skills and have minimal online experience? Implications for faculty preparation, professional growth, and considerations for online conversion are discussed.

Citation

Lizano-DiMare, M. & Bruciati, A. (2016). Faculty Development Initiative for Converting F2F Courses into Online Courses. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning (pp. 1375-1380). Washington, DC, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Adobe Creative Cloud (2015). [Computer software]. San Jose, CA: Adobe Systems Incorporated.
  2. Allen, I.E., & Seaman, J. (2015). Grade level: Tracking online education in the United States. Oakland, CA: Babson Survey Research Group and Quahog Research Group, LLC. Blackboard Learn™ (9) [Computer software]. Washington: DC, Blackboard, Inc.
  3. Bybee, R.W., & Loucks-Horsley, S. (2000). Advancing technology education: The role of professional development. Technology Teacher, 60(2), 31-34.
  4. Conzemius, A., & O'Neill, J. (2006). The power of SMART goals: Using goals to improve student learning. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree Press.
  5. Daly, A.J. (2010). Mapping the terrain: Social network theory and educational change. In Daly, A.J. (Eds.), Social network theory and educational change (pp.1-17). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.
  6. Diaz, V., & Brown, M. (2010). Blended learning: A report on the ELI focus session. ELI Paper 2. EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), Educause. Retrieved from https://library.educause.edu/~/media/files/library/2010/11/eli3023-pdf.pdf Donnelly, R., & Fitzmaurice, M. (2005). Designing modules for learning. In G.O'Neill, S. Moore& B. McMullin (eds.) Emerging issues in the practice of university learning and teaching, Dublin, All Ireland Society for Higher Education (AISHE).
  7. Garet, M.S., Porter, A.C., Desimone, L., Birman, B.F., & Yoon, K.S. (2001). What makes professional development effective? Results from a national sample of teachers. American Educational Research Journal, 38(4), 915–945.
  8. Gibbons, M. (2002). The self-directed learning handbook. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass. IClone (Version 5) [Computer software]. San Jose, CA: Reallusion, Inc.
  9. International Society for Technology in Education (2011). ISTE standards for coaches. Washington, DC. Kelsey, K..D. (2000). Participant interaction in a course delivered by interactive compressed video technology. The American Journal of Distance Education, 14(1), 63–74.
  10. Mishra, P., & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record. 108(6), 1017-1054.
  11. Moore, M.G. (1994). Administrative barriers to adoption of distance education. The American Journal of Distance Education, 8(3), 1-4.
  12. Neighbour, R. (2004). The inner consultation: How to develop an effective and intuitive consulting style. (2nd ed.). Oxford, England: Radcliffe Medical Press. Online Learning Consortium (OLC). (2016). Negotiating the many definitions of hybrid, online classes. Retrieved from http://onlinelearningconsortium.org/news_item/negotiating-many-definitions-hybrid-online-classes/ Platt, C.A., Raile, A.N.W., & Yu, N. (2014). Virtually the same?: Student perceptions of the equivalence of online classes to face-to-face classes. MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 10(3), 489–503.
  13. United States Department of Justice. (1973). Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. § 794d) Retrieved from http://www.ada.gov/508/index.html

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Designing Four Point Student Interaction in Online Trades Based Courses

    Dalton Mervold, Saskatchewan Polytechnic, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2017 (Oct 17, 2017) pp. 1706–1708

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.