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Online Education, Minority Students, and Library and Information Science: A Longitudinal Trend Data Analysis of ALA-Accredited Degree Program Enrollment Rates
PROCEEDING

, University of Michigan, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Washington, DC, United States Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Online education can promote equal access to higher education opportunities for minority students from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds. This study examines how the proliferation of online degree programs in library and information science (LIS) has impacted the racial and ethnic diversity of LIS students. Specifically, this study analyzes whether the presence or absence of a 100% online degree program accredited by the LIS field’s specialized accrediting agency, the American Library Association (ALA), influences racial and ethnic minority student enrollment and representation. The outcomes of this study on the relationships between online education, minority students, and LIS education will be useful to educators, scholars, and professionals who seek to promote educational opportunities of minority students.

Citation

Lieutenant, E. (2016). Online Education, Minority Students, and Library and Information Science: A Longitudinal Trend Data Analysis of ALA-Accredited Degree Program Enrollment Rates. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning (pp. 860-870). Washington, DC, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

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