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Online Student Perceptions of the Need for a Proximate Community of Engagement at an Independent Study Program
article

, Brigham Young Uiversity, United States ; , Brigham Young University, United States ; , George Mason University, United States ; , Brigham Young University, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 2, Number 4, ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Research suggests that collaborative learning designs for online courses which require interaction with teachers and peers promotes engagement and learning. K-12 students seek supplemental online courses to meet graduation requirements and desire flexibility which often conflicts with required interactions. This paper asserts that online independent study learners may create a Proximate Community of Engagement (PCE) in order to derive the benefits of collaboration and interactions. Using the Adolescent Community of Engagement (ACE) framework as a lens for identifying interactions, this study surveyed K-12 independent study students to assess their perception of the need for interaction with a support community while completing an online course. The study showed that students perceive the benefits of such a community and plan to receive support from parents, teachers, and counselors proximate to their location. The study also finds that the perception of the need is significantly greater for students taking a course for credit recovery than those taking the course for the first-time. Course providers can coach independent study students and family on how to create a Proximate Community of Engagement.

Citation

Oviatt, D.R., Graham, C.R., Borup, J. & Davies, R.S. (2016). Online Student Perceptions of the Need for a Proximate Community of Engagement at an Independent Study Program. Journal of Online Learning Research, 2(4), 333-365. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 21, 2019 from .

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