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For Every Tweet there is a Purpose: Twitter Within (and Beyond) an Online Graduate Program
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, , , Michigan State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Savannah, GA, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Little is known about the use of Twitter throughout entire degree programs. Graduate degrees in education may be of particular interest for researchers because participants’ variety of roles (e.g., working as teachers while enrolled as students) may correspond with the wide range of educational applications of Twitter. To explore this possibility, we examined the purposes that Twitter serves in one educational technology graduate program. We collected over 8,000 tweets containing any of 12 different program hashtags and coded a sample of them based on the purposes they appeared to serve. This resulted in six themes: contribute to disciplinary conversation, engage with disciplinary conversation, build community, make connections with other communities, ask for and provide support, and unclear or irrelevant purpose. We found evidence that tweets associated with these themes crossed and blurred boundaries between educational contexts, suggesting that Twitter may help teachers in several a

Citation

Greenhalgh, S.P., Rosenberg, J.M. & Wolf, L.G. (2016). For Every Tweet there is a Purpose: Twitter Within (and Beyond) an Online Graduate Program. In G. Chamblee & L. Langub (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2044-2049). Savannah, GA, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 16, 2018 from .

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