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Virtual Reality in the Classroom - An Exploration of Hardware, Management, Content and Pedagogy
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, , foundry10, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Savannah, GA, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Abstract: In this study we sought to investigate how teachers implement virtual reality into the classroom. Participants were seven middle and high school teachers who were given virtual reality hardware to augment their teaching. Pre and post interviews were conducted and analyzed to understand how teachers implemented VR, technological hurdles they encountered and how they incorporated content. Results revealed how teachers overcame hardware challenges, managed their classrooms, the importance of scaffolding the learning, and interesting effects on classroom collaboration. A key finding was that more content is needed in order to make VR a truly useful mechanism for learning in the non-tech classrooms but content creation is a viable option for tech-based classes.

Citation

Castaneda, L. & Pacampara, M. (2016). Virtual Reality in the Classroom - An Exploration of Hardware, Management, Content and Pedagogy. In G. Chamblee & L. Langub (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 527-534). Savannah, GA, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 19, 2019 from .

Keywords

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References

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Cited By

  1. A Usability Study on Low-Cost Virtual Reality Technology for Visualizing Digitized Canadian Cultural Objects: Implications in Education

    Miguel A. Garcia-Ruiz, Algoma University, Canada; Pedro C. Santana-Mancilla & Laura Sanely Gaytan-Lugo, University of Colima, Mexico

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2017 (Jun 20, 2017) pp. 259–264

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

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