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Professional Development Supports for the Blended, Co-Taught Classroom

, , University of North Carolina Wilmington, United States

Journal of Online Learning Research Volume 2, Number 2, ISSN 2374-1473 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

This qualitative study used survey research to examine a blended co-taught model of instruction designed for students enrolled in an Occupational Course of Study via the North Carolina Virtual Public School. While blended learning has successfully served the needs of students with disabilities, face-to-face and virtual teachers identify the need for professional development to successfully implement the model. Our large scale survey of educators teaching in a blended program to meet the needs of these students demonstrates the need for multiple layers of support.

Citation

Lewis, S. & Garrett Dikkers, A. (2016). Professional Development Supports for the Blended, Co-Taught Classroom. Journal of Online Learning Research, 2(2), 103-121. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 10, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. SITE Joint SIG Symposia: A Collaboration Between the K-12 Online Learning SIG and Distance Learning SIG: How Higher Education and K-12 Online Learning Research Can Impact Each Other

    Rick Ferdig, Kent State University, United States; Leanna Archambault, Arizona State University, United States; Kerry Rice, Boise State University, United States; Margaret Niess, Oregon State University, United States; Trisha Litz, Regis University, United States; Amy Garrett-Dikkers, University of North Carolina Wilmington, United States; Aimee Whiteside, University of Tampa, United States; Michael Barbour, Touro University, United States; David Marcovitz, Loyola University Maryland, United States; Antoinette Davis, Eastern Kentucky University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2017 (Mar 05, 2017) pp. 635–639

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