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Instructional Design and Situated Learning: Paradox or Partnership? ARTICLE

Educational Technology Volume 33, Number 3, ISSN 0013-1962

Abstract

Discusses the relationship between instructional design and situated learning. The transfer of knowledge and skills to a variety of settings is considered; and ways in which instructional design can contribute to the goals of situated learning are described, including planning learning experiences that are situated in the real world. (24 references) (LRW)

Citation

Winn, W. (1993). Instructional Design and Situated Learning: Paradox or Partnership?. Educational Technology, 33(3), 16-21. Retrieved November 17, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Traits, Skills, & Competencies Aligned with Workplace Demands: What Today's Instructional Designers Need to Master

    Jenny Wakefield, Scott Warren & Leila Mills, University of North Texas, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012 (Mar 05, 2012) pp. 3126–3132

  2. Authentic E-Learning in Higher Education: Design Principles for Authentic Learning Environments and Tasks

    Jan Herrington, University of Wollongong, Australia

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2006 (October 2006) pp. 3164–3173

  3. Connecting Theory to Practice – Using technology to support situated learning in vocational education

    Bee Ling Seow & Buay Choo Tang, Institute of Technical Education, Singapore

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2005 (October 2005) pp. 1518–1524

  4. Designing Learning Practices as Professional Development for Teacher Educators

    Linda Odenthal & Joke Voogt, University of Twente, Netherlands

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2000 (2000) pp. 698–703

  5. A Constructivist Look at Interaction and Collaboration via Computer Conferencing

    Karen L. Murphy & Mary Lu Epps, Texas A&M University, United States; Renee’ Drabier, University of Southern Colorado, United States

    International Journal of Educational Telecommunications Vol. 4, No. 2 (1998) pp. 237–261

  6. A Framework to Promote Learning and Generic Skills

    Joe Luca & Ron Oliver, Edith Cowan University, Australia

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2003 (2003) pp. 1588–1595

  7. Designing Effective Learning Environments for Distance Education: Integrating Technologies to Promote Learner Ownership and Collaborative Problem Solving

    Dennis Knapczyk & Haejin Chung, Indiana University, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 1999 (1999) pp. 742–746

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