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Constructivist Values for Instructional Systems Design: Five Principles toward a New Mindset ARTICLE

Educational Technology Research and Development Volume 41, Number 3, ISSN 1042-1629

Abstract

Summarizes the implications of constructivism for instructional systems design in five principles that integrate the affective and cognitive domains of learning. Distinguishing characteristics of the two approaches are described based on a review of recent literature, and examples are offered that discuss learner controlled computer-based instruction and motivation. (Contains 78 references.) (LRW)

Citation

Lebow, D. (1993). Constructivist Values for Instructional Systems Design: Five Principles toward a New Mindset. Educational Technology Research and Development, 41(3), 4-16. Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

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