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The Influence of Gender Difference on the Information-Seeking Behaviors for the Graphical Interface of Children's Digital Library
ARTICLE

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Universal Journal of Educational Research Volume 3, Number 3, ISSN 2332-3205

Abstract

Children conducting searches using the interfaces of library websites often encounter obstacles due to typographical errors, digital divides, or a failure to grasp keywords. Satisfaction with a given interface may also vary according to the gender of the user, making it a variable in information seeking behavior. Children benefit more from graphical information than text-based information with regard to learning. This study analyzed existing websites of public libraries to identify the issues facing children while using the interfaces. Based on these findings, we developed a graphical interface that children would find friendlier. In an evaluation of the proposed interface, girls presented a significantly higher success rate, compared to that of boys. We can therefore conclude that gender differences exist in the efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed interface. Qualitative observations also revealed gender differences in information seeking behavior, some principles of which are outlined in this study. Based on these findings, we present the following suggestions for libraries and future researchers: 1. Public libraries should establish websites with interfaces specifically designed for children; 2. Future researchers should take into account the gender differences associated with the operation of interfaces and information seeking behavior in the development of auxiliary information technologies; 3. Public libraries should consider creating interfaces specific for different age groups and genders.

Citation

Hsieh, T.y. & Wu, K.c. (2015). The Influence of Gender Difference on the Information-Seeking Behaviors for the Graphical Interface of Children's Digital Library. Universal Journal of Educational Research, 3(3), 200-206. Retrieved April 1, 2020 from .

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