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Accelerated Online Learning: Perceptions of Interaction and Learning Outcomes among African American Students
ARTICLE

American Journal of Distance Education Volume 28, Number 4, ISSN 0892-3647

Abstract

This study investigated student interaction, satisfaction, and performance in accelerated online learning environments with the use of an online learning course-management system. The interactions assessed in this study included learner-learner interaction, learner-instructor interaction, and learner-content interaction. The participants were African American students from a university in the southeastern United States. Quantitative approaches including correlation and regression analyses were performed to examine the contribution of interaction predictors to student satisfaction as well as the relationship between student satisfaction and student performance. In addition, Internet self-efficacy and its impact on interaction was investigated. The results showed that learner--content interaction was the only significant predictor of student satisfaction whereas interaction among students or with the instructor did not significantly predict student satisfaction. Internet self-efficacy was positively correlated with three types of interaction. Student satisfaction was found to be related to student performance.

Citation

Kuo, Y.C. (2014). Accelerated Online Learning: Perceptions of Interaction and Learning Outcomes among African American Students. American Journal of Distance Education, 28(4), 241-252. Retrieved December 6, 2019 from .

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