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Collaborative Inquiry with Technology in Secondary Science Classrooms: Professional Learning Community Development at Work
ARTICLE

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E-Learning and Digital Media Volume 11, Number 5, ISSN 2042-7530

Abstract

The development of critical scientific literacy in primary and secondary school classrooms requires authentic inquiry with a basis in the real world. Pairing scientists with educators and employing informatics and visualization tools are two successful ways to achieve this. This article is based on rich data collected over eight years from middle and high school chemistry, physics, biology, vocational, social studies, engineering, mathematics, computer science, and environmental studies classrooms across Illinois. Situated, longitudinal, external evaluation reveals strategies for successful--and significant--technology integration with demonstrable impact on science learners. Conclusions from the data are: (1) collaboration within teams composed of graduate students and faculty from the university and cooperating schools influences the degree of sustainable and transformative change in the classroom; (2) when teachers, scientists, and students feel supported by their institutions, meaningful inquiry occurs; (3) technologies have longterm impact when they are utilized for authentic problem solving, creating engaging experiences for both students and teachers; (4) sustainability and scalability can be achieved at and between institutions where teaming, tools, and inquiry are allowed to develop. This research was conducted as part of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Teaching Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12) Program at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign under Principal Investigators Eric Jakobsson, Richard Braatz, and Deanna Raineri.

Citation

Harnisch, D.L., Comstock, S.L. & Bruce, B.C. (2014). Collaborative Inquiry with Technology in Secondary Science Classrooms: Professional Learning Community Development at Work. E-Learning and Digital Media, 11(5), 495-505. Retrieved June 27, 2019 from .

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