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Point-of-Need Research Instruction in the LMS: Best Practices for Providing Information Literacy Performance Support to Online Graduate Students
PROCEEDINGS

, Concordia University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-16-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

Large online programs with thousands of students require efficient and scalable responses to information literacy instruction. Taking a cue from the field of performance support, distance education librarians can create resources that are strategically embedded in online subject curricula at the point-of-need. Point-of-need instruction answers learner questions preventatively and improves librarian and learner efficiency. By providing point-of-need performance support in the learning management system (LMS), students can receive targeted instruction for frequently asked questions and complete assignments while gaining research skills. This pedagogy also benefits faculty librarians, allowing them to effectively instruct hundreds or thousands of students simultaneously and providing more time for longer, topic-specific one-on-one research instruction. Librarians at Concordia University Portland provide point-of-need performance support for more than 6,000 online graduate students. This.

Citation

Read, K. (2015). Point-of-Need Research Instruction in the LMS: Best Practices for Providing Information Literacy Performance Support to Online Graduate Students. In S. Carliner, C. Fulford & N. Ostashewski (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia 2015--World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (pp. 1291-1296). Montreal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

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