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Beyond teachers’ neurophilia and neurophobia : towards warranted contributions from educational neuroscience to teaching practices PROCEEDINGS

, University of Quebec in Montreal, Canada

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Educational neuroscience is now part of the landscape of educational research. While interdisciplinary research is currently intensifying to fulfill the potential of this field in informing teaching practices, it seems reasonable to expect that unwarranted educational applications from neuroscience will continue to appear and be promoted, at least for many years to come. Moreover, applications adequately supported by research may be distorted from their original intent by the increasing availability of low-cost wearable technologies that can measure, record and even affect aspects of psychophysiological functioning. The aim of this paper is to suggest that appropriate teacher training can contribute to the sound adoption of practices inspired by research involving neuroscience and to the rejection of practices that are questionable on scientific and ethical grounds, which may or may not involve using wearable technologies.

Citation

Mercier, J. (2015). Beyond teachers’ neurophilia and neurophobia : towards warranted contributions from educational neuroscience to teaching practices. In D. Rutledge & D. Slykhuis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2015--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1788-1793). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 26, 2017 from .