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Microlearning as a Tool to Engage Students in Online and Blended Learning PROCEEDINGS

, University of Texas at Arlington, United States ; , , The University of Texas at Arlington, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This best practices session focuses on exploration of the topic of using microlearning in both online and blended learning environments. The session will provide a definition of microlearning as well as the creation and location of microcontent, drawing on key ideas and principles from Theo Hug (2006; 2010). According to Hug (2010), microlearning overlaps theoretically and in practice with the topic of mobile learning. Microlearning experiences, for instance, can include short bursts of asynchronous learning such as brief readings of digital text(s), a brief video segment followed by a 2-3 question quiz, or a micropodcast. Instructors can use microlearning in flexible and fluid ways within, or in addition to the regular course content. Concrete examples of microlearning from across subject areas will be explored; teaching ideas and handouts will be provided.

Citation

Semingson, P., Crosslin, M. & Dellinger, J. (2015). Microlearning as a Tool to Engage Students in Online and Blended Learning. In D. Rutledge & D. Slykhuis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2015--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 474-479). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 21, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Distributed Learning: A Flexible Learning and Development Model

    Stephen Victor & Shannon Hart, Obsidian Learning, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2016 (Nov 14, 2016) pp. 281–290

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.