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Synchronous Hybrid Learning Environments: Perspectives on Learning, Instruction, and Technology in Unique Educational Contexts
PROCEEDINGS

, , , , , , , Michigan State University, United States ; , , , University of Victoria, Canada

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This symposium addresses issues related to teaching and learning in synchronous hybrid environments (previously synchromodal learning environments). Synchronous hybrid environments are technology-rich learning environments that enable online and face-to-face students to interact synchronously with each other as well as with the instructor in a shared learning experience (Bell, Sawaya, Cain, 2014). A number of research perspectives will be discussed, including issues of design, transactional distance, social presence, and more. Presenters in this symposium will also describe the theoretical and pragmatic ways in which synchronous hybrid classes can be supported and researched. The goal is to bring fresh ideas and first-hand experiences to bear on questions of learning and instruction in these exciting and complex pedagogical contexts.

Citation

Cain, W., Bell, J., Cheng, C., Sawaya, S., Peterson, A., Arnold, B., Good, J., Irvine, V., McCue, R. & Little, T. (2015). Synchronous Hybrid Learning Environments: Perspectives on Learning, Instruction, and Technology in Unique Educational Contexts. In D. Rutledge & D. Slykhuis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2015--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 205-210). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved January 16, 2019 from .

Keywords

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References

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