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Media Culture 2020 - An Exploration of Collaborative Learning PROCEEDINGS

, University of Lincoln, United Kingdom

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in New Orleans, LA, USA ISBN 978-1-939797-12-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper addresses issues of best practice and methods of ‘blended learning’ piloted throughout 2013 during the EU Erasmus Intensive Programme ‘Media Culture 2020’. The interdisciplinary project, which featured five universities from across Europe, was designed to develop new collaborative approaches to teaching and learning. The international partnership was comprised of staff and students from University of Vic (Spain), Tampere University of Applied Sciences (Finland), Liepaja University (Latvia), the University of Lincoln (United Kingdom) and HKU Hilversum (Netherlands).

The project featured two, two-week workshops, alongside the implementation of a number of collaborative, networked technologies. A range of social media platforms and computer software were utilised to create open, virtual spaces where students from different countries and fields could explore and learn together.

Citation

Thayne, M. (2014). Media Culture 2020 - An Exploration of Collaborative Learning. In T. Bastiaens (Ed.), Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning (pp. 2207-2212). New Orleans, LA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 16, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

  1. Bonk, C.J. & Graham, C.R. (2006), The handbook of blended learning environments: Global perspectives, local designs. San Francisco: Jossey‐Bass/Pfeiffer. P.5
  2. Dunn, R. & Griggs, S. (2010), Practical Approaches to Using Learning Styles in Higher Education. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.
  3. Garrison, D.R., & Kanuka, H. (2004), ‘Blended learning: Uncovering its transformative potential in higher education’, The Internet and Higher Education. 7. P.95–105

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