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Utilizing Online Discussion to Support Reflection and Challenge Beliefs in Elementary Mathematics Methods Classrooms
Article

, Washington State University—Tri-Cities, United States ; , Washington State University—Vancouver, United States

CITE Journal Volume 2, Number 4, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

A fundamentally important experience for preservice teachers (PSTs) in a mathematics methods course is the self-examination of beliefs about mathematics and the teaching and learning of mathematics. Research suggests that beliefs about mathematics have an impact on teaching practices (Ernest, 1989; Franke, Carpenter, Levi, & Fennema, 2001; Philippou & Christou, 1998, Thompson, 1984), but can be quite difficult to change (Cooney, Shealy, & Arvold, 1998; McGinnis, Kramer, Roth McDuffie, & Watanabe, 1998; Richardson, 1996). There is also evidence that beliefs about mathematics are more closely related to classroom practice than beliefs about mathematics pedagogy (Raymond, 1997). Because many preservice teachers enter methods courses with naïve views of both mathematics and constructivist pedagogy (Ball, 1996; Ma, 1999), it is vital that challenges to assumptions about the nature of mathematics be made to support a reanalysis of PSTs' views of mathematical content and pedagogy.

Citation

Roth McDuffie, A. & Slavit, D. (2002). Utilizing Online Discussion to Support Reflection and Challenge Beliefs in Elementary Mathematics Methods Classrooms. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 2(4), 447-465. Norfolk, VA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved May 27, 2022 from .

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