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Increasing Computer and Internet Access for Economically-Disadvantaged Families
PROCEEDINGS

, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, United States ; , , , Wake Forest University, United States ; , Habitat for Humanity, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-48-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The organization Habitat for Humanity has become synonymous with efforts to lessen the division between upper and lower economic groups by providing decent, affordable housing. This paper describes an ongoing project which uses the Habitat venue, supported by a number of technology companies and a research university, to place computers and Internet access in the homes of the economically disadvantaged. Computers with Internet access have been placed in the homes of 116 (with an eventual goal of 200 homes) Habitat for Humanity families with a median income of $22,000. In a two-year longitudinal design, parents and children are assessed on previous and current computer usage, attitudes and anxiety towards technology, computer effects on social behavior, measures of psychological well-being, family interactions, job satisfaction, and school performance. Baseline, two-month post computer installation, and six-month assessments will be presented.

Citation

Davis, S., Yadley, L., Best, D., King, R. & Murray, S. (2003). Increasing Computer and Internet Access for Economically-Disadvantaged Families. In D. Lassner & C. McNaught (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2003--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 3204-3205). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 23, 2019 from .

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