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Some Advantages and Disadvantages of Narrow-Cast Instructional Television: One Instructor's Experience [and] The Effects of Individual and Team Learning on Performance during Computer-Assisted Instruction
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Abstract

The first of two papers describes the author's experiences teaching a narrow-cast instructional development course at Indiana University. Among the disadvantages of the experience were the logistics of coordinating the instructional activities between two campuses, additional preparation time requirements, diminished student-teacher interactions, and negative learner attitudes. Advantages included smoother, more effective class sessions; more effective text and graphic visuals; decreased cost; increased course offerings; a more diverse group of learners; and the opportunity to demonstrate the use of alternative instructional delivery strategies to novice instructional developers. The second paper describes a study which compared the performance and attitudes toward instruction of 60 eighth-grade students who worked either individually or in two-member teams on a computer-assisted sex education lesson. It was found that learners working together significantly out-performed those working alone, but no significant differences were observed on the attitude toward instruction measure. Mean percent scores for the verbal information and visual recall posttests and for the attitude survey are appended, and three references are provided. (Author/MES)

Citation

Dalton, D.W. Some Advantages and Disadvantages of Narrow-Cast Instructional Television: One Instructor's Experience [and] The Effects of Individual and Team Learning on Performance during Computer-Assisted Instruction. Retrieved December 12, 2019 from .

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