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The Effects of Convergent and Divergent Computer Software on Children's Critical and Creative Thinking
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Abstract

This study was undertaken to determine whether convergent or divergent computer software better enhances children's critical and creative thinking skills. Subjects were 40 elementary students (4th, 5th, and 6th grades), who were randomly assigned to either convergent or divergent software treatment. These students interacted for 25 hours with numerous software packages designed to encourage the thinking skills of their treatment. Three tests were then administered: Schaefer's Creative Attitude Survey, the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking, and the Cornell Critical Thinking Test. As hypothesized, subjects in the divergent group scored higher than the convergent group on all 14 measures within the creative thinking test. However, only one of the 14 comparisons was at a significant level. No differences were found on either the critical thinking test or the creative attitude survey. A listing of packages used by each group and a table displaying statistical data are appended. (24 references) (Author/EW)

Citation

Bonk, C.J. The Effects of Convergent and Divergent Computer Software on Children's Critical and Creative Thinking. Retrieved May 25, 2019 from .

This record was imported from ERIC on March 21, 2014. [Original Record]

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